Writing an acceptable use policy for schools

Terminology[ edit ] AUP documents are similar to and often serve the same function as the Terms of Service document e. In the case of IBM. The examples and perspective in this article deal primarily with the United Kingdom and do not represent a worldwide view of the subject.

Writing an acceptable use policy for schools

Internet Resources Brief Description The Internet is a wide open environment that contains many helpful educational resources, but also many documents, images, and files that may not be suitable for children.

To help deal with concerns about students accessing inappropriate materials, many school districts are developing and implementing acceptable use policies for their teachers, staff, and students.

These policies help protect school systems from any liability incurred by allowing students, teachers, and staff access to the variety of information on the Internet. This activity describes how to develop an acceptable use policy, suggestions for getting community support for this policy, and references to other resources available on the development and implementation of these policies.

Goals Learn if your school system already has an acceptable use policy for technology. Learn how to write an acceptable use policy for technology in your school. Get school board support and approval for an acceptable use policy. Gather local support from students, teachers, staff, and parents as you implement your acceptable use policy.

Learn where to get additional information on acceptable use policies. Materials and Resources In developing our lessons and activities, we made some assumptions about the hardware and software that would be available in the classroom for teachers who visit the LETSNet Website.

In the section below, we specify any "special" hardware or software requirements for a lesson or activity in addition to those described above and the level of Internet access required to do the activity.

Activity Description Bringing technology into the classroom can be a powerful, if not frightening, process. Along with all the wonderful resources available on the Internet there are some things parents and teachers may not want their children and students to experience.

writing an acceptable use policy for schools

To help students, parents, teachers, and staff understand, engage in, and monitor wise use of the Internet, many school systems are implementing acceptable use policies AUP for their students and personnel.

These policies lay out under what conditions access to the Internet from a school computer is acceptable and when it is not. These policies generally take the form of a written document which describes what is acceptable school use of technology.

Many communities are implementing policies that guide student, teacher, and staff use of technological resources so as to limit liability and restrict access to those resources that are deemed "appropriate" for educational use. Restricting access to resources brings up concerns of censorship.

School districts need to address these concerns by thinking carefully about what they want their students to have access to, how they want to restrict access assuming they doand what they will do when students gain access to materials deemed inappropriate.

While each community must decide for itself what it feels is appropriate use of technology, there are many helpful resources available on the Internet that can guide the creation and implementation of an acceptable use policy for schools.

In addition to the resources in the Internet Resources section below, school personnel may wish to consider the following issues when developing an acceptable use policy: Get broad support for any acceptable use policy.

Ideally, a school board should be directly involved in establishing any acceptable use policy adopted by a school district. Since the issues around restrictions to resources are often controversial, school board members who are elected officials will be held accountable for whatever policy restrictions are implemented.

Since popular support is key, AUPs should be drafted by teams involving board members, teachers, parents, and others in the community. Deal with concerns of censorship by addressing specific situations to be covered in the acceptable use policy as well as defining what the outcome of such actions might be.Acceptable Use Policy Free Use Disclaimer: This policy was created by or for the SANS Institute for the Internet The purpose of this policy is to outline the acceptable use of computer equipment at.

These rules are in place to protect the . An Acceptable Use Policy is a set of rules and guidelines meant to govern an employee’s use of a company’s technology resources, including the Internet. When implemented at a company, an AUP clearly communicates what is (and is not) permitted on company computers and networks.

Acceptable Use of Technology—Students - Policy Section 1.

writing an acceptable use policy for schools

Purpose of Technology Use. The Oak Park and River Forest High School District provides technology resources to its students solely for educational purposes. Directions: After reading the Monroe County Schools Acceptable Use Policy, a parent or guardian should click on the following link to complete the acknowledgment form: Monroe County Schools Acceptable Use Policy Acknowledgment Form This form must be completed before students are allowed to use the Internet at MPHS.

An Acceptable Use Policy is a set of rules and guidelines meant to govern an employee’s use of a company’s technology resources, including the Internet. When implemented at a company, an AUP clearly communicates what is (and is not) permitted on company computers and networks.

This policy, supported by the school’s acceptable use agreements for staff, governors, visitors and pupils, is to protect the interests and safety of the whole school community. It is linked to the following mandatory school policies: child protection, health and.

Technology Integration Resources: Online Student and Computer Safety