Moral values are must in a student life

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Moral values are must in a student life

Nord and Charles C. Haynes Table of Contents Chapter 9. Moral Education The preceding five chapters have dealt with the proper place of religion in particular courses. Moral education, however, is generally understood to cut across the curriculum and is appropriately integrated into all courses as well as into the extra curricular activities and ethos of schools.

So our focus shifts somewhat in this last chapter. Of course, good people can make bad judgments; it's often not easy to know what is morally right. The second task of moral education is to provide students with the intellectual resources that enable them to make informed and responsible judgments about difficult matters of moral importance.

Both are proper and important tasks of schools—and both cut across the curriculum. The inevitable question, of course, is, whose morality will be taught? We will offer our answer by way of a sketch of a theory of moral education. Given this theory—and the civic and educational frameworks we outlined in Chapters 1 and 2—we will draw out the implications for the role of religion in moral education.

To put a little flesh on these theoretical bones, we will take sex education as a case study. Education as a Moral Enterprise We trust that it is uncontroversial to say that schooling is unavoidably a moral enterprise. Indeed, schools teach morality in a number of ways, both implicit and explicit.

Schools have a moral ethos embodied in rules, rewards and punishments, dress codes, honor codes, student government, relationships, styles of teaching, extracurricular emphases, art, and in the kinds of respect accorded students and teachers.

Schools convey to children what is expected of them, what is normal, what is right and wrong. It is often claimed that values are caught rather than taught; through their ethos, schools socialize children into patterns of moral behavior.

Textbooks and courses often address moral questions and take moral positions. Literature inevitably explores moral issues, and writers take positions on those issues—as do publishers who decide which literature goes in the anthologies.

In teaching history we initiate students into particular cultural traditions and identities. The overall shape of the curriculum is morally loaded by virtue of what it requires, what it makes available as electives, and what it ignores.

For example, for more than a century but especially since A Nation at Risk and the reform reports of the sthere has been a powerful movement to make schooling and the curriculum serve economic purposes.

Religion and art, by contrast, have been largely ignored and are not even elective possibilities in many schools.

The Fallacies of Moralism and Moral Aestheticism

As a result, schooling encourages a rather more materialistic and less spiritual culture—a matter of some moral significance. Educators have devised a variety of approaches to values and morality embodied in self-esteem, community service, civic education, sex education, drug education, Holocaust education, multicultural education, values clarification, and character education programs—to name but a few.

We might consider two of the most influential of these approaches briefly. For the past several decades values clarification programs have been widely used in public schools. Values are ultimately personal; indeed, the implicit message is that there are no right or wrong values.

Needless to say, this is a deeply controversial approach—and is now widely rejected. The character education movement of the last decade has been a response, in part, to the perceived relativism of values clarification.

Finally, we note what is conspicuous by its absence: Unlike either values clarification or character education programs, the major purpose of ethics courses is usually to provide students with intellectual resources drawn from a variety of traditions and schools of thought that might orient them in the world and help them think through difficult moral problems.

As important as we all agree morality to be, it is striking that schools do not consider ethics courses an option worth offering.

Training and Education In Chapter 2 we distinguished between socialization, training, and indoctrination on the one hand,and education on the other.

Education as a Moral Enterprise

Socialzation, we suggested, is the uncritical initiation of students into a tradition, a way of thinking and acting. Education, by contrast, requires critical distance from tradition, exposure to alternatives, informed and reflective deliberation about how to think and live.

Not all, but much character education might better be called character training or socialization, for the point is not so much to teach virtue and values by way of critical reflection on contending points of view, but to structure the moral ethos of schooling to nurturing the development of those moral habits and virtues that we agree to be good and important, that are part of our moral consensus.

This is not a criticism of character education. Children must be morally trained. Character education does appeal, as the Manifesto makes clear, to a heritage of stories, literature, art, and biography to inform and deepen students' understanding of, and appreciation for, moral virtue.

Often such literature will reveal the moral ambiguities of life, and discussion of it will encourage critical reflection on what is right and wrong. But if the literature is chosen to nurture the development of the right virtues and values, it may not be well suited to nurture an appreciation of moral ambiguity or informed and critical thinking about contending values and ways of thinking and living.

Of course, character education programs often nurture the virtues of tolerance, respect, and civility that play major roles in enabling educational discussion of controversial issues.1. Aims and Methods of Moral Philosophy. The most basic aim of moral philosophy, and so also of the Groundwork, is, in Kant’s view, to “seek out” the foundational principle of a “metaphysics of morals,” which Kant understands as a system of a priori moral principles that apply the CI to human persons in all times and cultures.

Kant pursues this project through the first two chapters.

Moral values are must in a student life

Jan 15,  · These few days have been a blur because things are happening so fast! I have lots to blog about, but because I'm short of time, I'll just post this list of moral values. Moral Development. This entry analyzes moral development as a perennial philosophical view complemented by modern empirical research programs.

The two initial sections summarize what moral development is and why it is important for ethics and human nature theory. A. Introduction B. Impacting moral and character development C. Three exemplary programs D. Summary and conclusions E.

References Introduction. As previously stated in the section related to desired student outcomes (Huitt, a), in my opinion there are three major issues in the education of young people today. The first is the development of a vision for one's life that includes the. Welcome to the Student Life section of Alice Lloyd College’s website.

These pages will give you a comprehensive view of the College’s policies, programs, and support systems outside of the classroom. Ethics, also called moral philosophy, the discipline concerned with what is morally good and bad, right and wrong.

The term is also applied to any system or theory of moral values or principles.. How should we live? Shall we aim at happiness or at knowledge, virtue, or the creation of beautiful objects?If we choose happiness, will it be our own or the happiness of all?

Ethics - Wikipedia